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Way Back When in Santa Barbara -- 100 Years Ago

Way Back When - 100 years ago today - January 17, 1919

WAY BACK WHEN - 100 years ago today, on January 17, 1919, an article in the Santa Barbara newspaper explained that the term "dough boy" originated during the Mexican-American War of 1846-48. When the American soldiers were in Mexico, many of them stayed in homes made of adobe, which was also called "dobie." Over time, "dobie" morphed into "doughboy." So now you know. (Image: wikimedia)

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Way Back When - 100 years ago today - January 10, 1919

WAY BACK WHEN - 100 years ago today, on January 10, 1919, the local record store in Santa Barbara had an ad in the paper for records with titles such as, "The Rose of No Man's Land," "The Yanks with the Tanks Will Go Thru the Germans' Ranks," and my personal favorite, "Would You Rather Be a Colonel with an Eagle on Your Shoulder, or a Private with a Chicken on Your Knee?"

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Way Back When - 100 years ago today - January 1, 1919

WAY BACK WHEN - 100 years ago today, on January 1, 1919, an editorial in the Santa Barbara newspaper wrote, "Let us be kinder to our neighbors and truer to ourselves. Let us be more charitable, and less selfish." Words that could be repeated this year, and every year!

(Image: Santa Barbara Morning Press, January 1, 1919)

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Way Back When - 100 years ago today - December 17, 1918

WAY BACK WHEN, 100 years ago today on December 17, 1918, the local paper mentioned the visit of author N.H. Chittenden. "At present, he is engaged in writing a defense of the early inhabitants of the West, defending them against what he calls the slanderous misrepresentation of the moving picture films. He declares that the early inhabitants of California were kindly, law-abiding citizens, who have been converted into 'roughnecks' and bandits by the imagination of scenario writers." More about the author in "Way Back When: Santa Barbara in 1918." (Photo of a Cocopah man. Image: Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, 1901)

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Way Back When in Santa Barbara - December 15, 1918

WAY BACK WHEN, 100 years ago today on December 15, 1918, the local paper announced, "Santa Barbara is to be on the Langley airway … as the result of plans mapped and recommended by the Aero Club of America. The air route is to be used for commercial and military use." The route would start in Philadelphia, then go to Pittsburg, Columbus, Dayton, Indianapolis, St. Louis, Kansas City … and wind up in Southern California at Santa Barbara. Just one little detail needed to be worked out – we didn't have an airfield yet. More about the search for an airfield in Way Back When: Santa Barbara in 1918. (Photo of a Curtis biplane from WWI. Image: Wikimedia)

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Way Back When in Santa Barbara - November 11, 1918

(Image: Library of Congress)

WAY BACK WHEN, 100 years ago today, on November 11, 1918, the word reached Santa Barbara, that the Great War in Europe had ended. The next day the paper wrote, "Within 15 minutes after the first news was received, State Street was alive with revelers. Long lines of cars coursed the thoroughfares, cow bells, tin cans – anything that would make a noise – rattling behind; horns honking and the occupants shouting an accompaniment." Peace! Peace at last!

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Way Back When in Santa Barbara -- November 5, 1918

(Image: Illustrated Current News, October 18, 1918)

WAY BACK WHEN, 100 years ago today, on November 5, 1918, in the midst of the Spanish Flu pandemic, the local paper wrote, "Beginning at noon Wednesday, November 6, no person will be allowed to enter or to ride upon any streetcar, auto bus, taxicab or other vehicle … without wearing a mask, veil or handkerchief securely fastened over the nose and mouth. By order of the Board of Health of Santa Barbara."

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Way Back When in Santa Barbara -- October 26, 1918

WAY BACK WHEN, 100 years ago today, on October 26 1918, the local paper reminded people to turn back their clocks. Daylight Saving Time had begun in the United States in March 1918 for the first time when folks set their clocks ahead. Now people were being reminded that it was time to change their clocks again. Although this was the first year for "spring ahead; fall back," there were no more disruptions than we experience today.

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Way Back When in Santa Barbara -- October 20, 1918

(Photo: courtesy of John Fritsche)

WAY BACK WHEN, 100 years ago today, on October 20, 1918, the Lockheed/Loughead brothers of Santa Barbara announced their plans to fly their F-1A plane from Santa Barbara to Washington, D.C. They had set a record in April when they flew their seaplane from here to San Diego, and had high hopes for this next trip. [Spoiler alert - this new venture did not end well. More info will be coming in "Way Back When: Santa Barbara in 1918."] 

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Way Back When in Santa Barbara -- October 14, 1918

Way Back When, 100 years ago today on October 14, 1918, the dreaded Spanish Influenza pandemic hit Santa Barbara. As if the telegrams arriving with news of local boys dying in the war in Europe were not bad enough, now we were battling the flu here at home. I'll be giving a talk about the flu and WWI called "Countdown to Armistice" at the Goleta Historical Society on Sunday, Nov. 4 at 3 p.m., and at the SB Central Library on Sunday, Nov. 11 at 2 p.m. (Both the flu and the war will be part of my "Way Back When: Santa Barbara in 1918" book to be released soon.)

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